Life On The Street - Daniel's Story

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Living on the streets is a hard reality for so many young boys in Kenya. In this harsh world they are subject to physical, sexual and emotional abuse. To mask the pain and hunger they face on a daily basis, the majority of these boys become reliant on the mentally damaging high they experience from sniffing glue. No one should have to sleep in a gutter with a sack as a bed, exposed and completely vulnerable to anyone walking by, but this is the type of fear the young boys we work with face, every night.

 

One of our street social workers met Daniel living on the streets of Kakamega, a small town in western Kenya where around 300 boys can be living on the street at any one time. Daniel grew up in a single parent home with his mother.  She was living in extreme poverty and couldn’t buy food or pay school fees for Daniel’s education. At the age of 12 and desperate, he ran away to live on the streets, hoping to make money and provide food for his family. Daniel spent a total of a year and a half living on the streets.

 

Through our social workers building relationship with Daniel during his time living on the streets, we were able to carry out a social enquiry and investigation into his circumstances. We found that his home and mother were a loving and safe environment and it was purely down to poverty and desperation that lead to Daniel running away to live on the streets. We have been able to work with the family to help them to be reunited and break free from poverty, to be in a position where they can send Daniel to school. 

 

Daniel has been living back home for 8 months now and is doing extremely well. He is now attending secondary school and was recently placed 12th out of 144 students, scoring 97/100 in a recent academic assessment. He is also performing very well in Chemistry, Creative Studies and Agriculture. Out of all the children we have reintegrated back into their family homes, Daniel is the first to attend secondary school.

 

Daniel is one of the older boys we have helped reintegrate back home. He is very caring and good at encouraging the other children we work with. We are very proud of him and how far he has come, despite the hardships he has faced, even at such a young age. We want to thank everyone who supports and follows us on this journey to see children freed from their desperate situations. We couldn’t do this without you.

 

To find out how you can partner with us to see even more children set free from situations like Daniel’s, you can email us atinfo@thekcp.org or if you’d like to make a donation to the work we do with street children, you can do this through our website at www.thekcp.org

Samuel Nudds